Thursday, November 30, 2006

Scrubs: They really like to dance

Spoilers for the return of "Scrubs" just as soon as I get the address of that Joe Piscopo Lookalike Contest...

Turk danced! Turk danced! Turk danced! Okay, so it wasn't as brilliant as the last time, and I don't know for certain that I was directly responsible for the scene (even though I asked the writers to do it, like, seven dozen times over a one-hour lunch), but any time you combine Donald Faison and slightly vintage music video moves, good things happen.

The rest of the episode? Up and down. I wasn't one of the people too put off by last year's drive into wackier territory, but this one felt like everyone was trying too hard for the big return: the random Blue Man Group appearance, the make-up enhanced alt-versions of J.D., Cox and The Janitor, the big stunt where The Janitor turns J.D. into the American flag, etc. There was too much payoff, not enough set up.

And yet my favorite moments all involved the bizarre throwaways: Ted and Keith Dudemeister mixing Pop Rocks and soda, The Janitor pondering a sex change, Alt-Janitor's "I punched a whale," Kim weeping over her brother's death at the hands of a Funky Cold Medina (which reminded me a bit of the Bobby McFerrin sketch from the Alec Baldwin "SNL"), etc. So I'm having trouble putting my finger on exactly what bothered me about this episode, save for the obvious answer that I didn't laugh as much as I often do when I watch the show.

But hell, it's back, Turk danced again, and Cox wore his Z. Cavaricci pants again, so I'm not going to complain too much. What did everybody else think?

8 comments:

EzekielRawlins said...

I have to agree, it did seem a bit hit and miss, but man, when it hit...

The 'Turk Dance' did seem a bit forced, but it was good to see the old gang again. As for the Alts, the only one I thought was funny was Alt-Janitor.

And yeah, I do believe I'll be trying that gatorade stunt.

Eric said...

For me, there was a bit too much whiplash between the serious moments and the wacky. I felt emotionally invested enough in J.D.'s storyline that most of the rest of the episode felt like a distraction, and the makeup on the alt-selves was just distracting.

Joel said...

I'm with you, Alan... Not as brilliant as the standard, but when it *was* funny, it was really funny. I especially liked the running gag about... uh, running.

The most complicated jokes were the least funny ones. Makes me wonder if the musical episode is going to be that one step too far for Lawrence and company. I hope it's not.

Oh, and John McGinley's hair looked weird. Did it still have spaghetti in it or something?

And, did you have lunch with Bill Lawerence and the writers, Alan? I can't tell, since you really haven't mentioned it too much :).

Alan Sepinwall said...

Joel, I think it's fair to say I'm done dining out on that story. :)

Roper said...

Average episode in my opinion. I think they were trying to hard almost or maybe I just expected too much.

But if you were worried about the musical episode (I was at first), don't be. Check this out. http://youtube.com/watch?v=GF6rSGfUdyg . Hilarious.

Anonymous said...

My problem with last night's episode was that the cast seemed to look really tired. I've always admired Scrubs for their ability to balance the sincere and heartfelt with the humor and wacky. It seemed that they were pushing the funny so much, they lost me on the heartfelt. There were definite elements that made me laugh, but it felt like I was watching a bastardized sub-par version of my show.

Marsha said...

Alan, I missed it! Do you know where I can legally download a copy? It's not on NBC's site, and not on iTunes yet. Damn Comcast DVR!

donboy said...

The whole makeup thing either didn't work, or worked too well. The big emotional moment is supposed to be when they (although they only did it for JD) "see" the patients as they really are. But first the show has to make sure that we understand that we're seeing the regulars in disguise makeup, so they have to give us the fade-to-normal-actor thing first to clarify it, which undercuts the revelation of the woman patient as she really is.