Monday, February 11, 2008

The Wire week 7 thread for the On Demand'ers

You know what to do here: talk about episode seven of "The Wire" here. Do not talk about any future episodes, and do not talk about this episode in last night's review thread.

119 comments:

Bryan said...

The picture is a bit spoiler-y. These are two characters we don't normally see together.

Will Omar kill Michael?


Hmmmm.

chicken biscuit said...

the scene was shown in the "next week on The Wire" preview though, so probably fair game

Anonymous said...

I'm not looking at the comments even a little bit, but Alan's choices of pictures of late have been a bit spoiler-y for my liking. This one, and Randy below (as a European, I have to wait until Monday to see Sunday's episode).

--AH

Alan Sepinwall said...

This late in the season, it's hard to pick out photos that aren't spoiler-y to someone, somewhere. Having seen the episode -- as well as what HBO is putting in the previews -- I feel comfortable with what I chose.

Dan Jardine said...

The final scene in this episode is a killer. Sonja Smits nails the ghetto version of Goodnight Moon in a really touching piece of acting. Also, an uncharacteristically "showy" piece of camera work on a show known much more for the gritty realism of its cinematography.

Really terrific. Given everything that Kima has been through in her personal life, this immediately leaps into my top ten most affecting Wire scenes.

QuemaPueblos said...

i also liked the ending of episode 7... it definitely added more Dr. Strangelove elements to the season. I was surprised to see that this was Dominic West's directorial debut on the show.

Ronnie Mo said...

Well, promise to Bunk or no, it looks like Omar is back to dropping bodies. We all know the Wire specializes in call-backs and references to previous episodes, but bringing Savino back from Season 1 felt particularly satisfying. (I guess he is already out of jail for his part in Kima's shooting? Thought he would have done more time...)
So now, of Avon's original muscle from Season 1, Omar has killed Savino and Stinkum, Wee-Bey killed Little Man, and Bird and Wee-Bey are in jail. Is this the official end of the original Barksdale crew?

Kathy said...

Well, sheeeeeeeeeeeeiiiiittttttt. Clay Davis - both in the scene with his lawyer and in the courtroom - was the standout of this episode. Guy is amazing. I loved the comment by the guy in the newsroom, something to the effect of "After this verdict, I'm feeling very white". I was hoping for Carcetti's reaction to the verdict, that would have been sweet. Maybe next week.

I hated to see Omar break his code, though that's probably only been a matter of time. (If he had to go off on someone, it couldn't have been Kenard? Damn, that kid is obnoxious).

My favorite moment of the episode was Dukie doing a goofy exotic dance on the corner.

Anonymous said...

"I guess he is already out of jail for his part in Kima's shooting?"

I think that he wasn't charged in that. He spoke with the police, but all that he admitted was that he was going to try & sell baking powder to Orlando. Add in Wee-Bay admitting to just about any Barksdale-related shotting that he could, it's possible that Savino just served a minimum sentence.

As for the original Barksdale crew, I believe that Poot is still out there, but he was at a much lower level in the first season.

JP said...

Ahh, good catch quemapueblos, I didn't notice that this was the one West directed. I'll have to re-watch it with that in mind.

Interesting that this was the last episode they sent in advance to the critics. So many things are coming together that it's a good thing that the last three episodes are unknown by anyone not on the production staff at this point.

Any chance those last three episodes might be 90 minutes long each? A man can dream, I guess.

I was a little disappointed that the Clay Davis case was over and done with in one day. I was hoping to see it drag out for a while longer. I'm not at all surprised by the end result at any rate. What happens to the Bond character at this point? Does he pursue the leak or does he fade away?

For that matter, where does Clay Davis himself fit in for the rest of the series?

Clay's lawyer was played by someone I've seen in the news. Anyone know who he is?

Nice touch to continuity to see Savino back, if only for a few minutes. Was that also him discovering the dope flushed in the stash house? I didn't recognize him at that point.

It was nice to see McNutty handing out overtime to get cases put down, but you could see that it was already out of hand for him, and he is already unsure about how to tie it in with the Marlo case.

Speaking of Marlo, was this the first episode of the season with no Marlo, no Chris, and no Snoop?

It's interesting to see the way Gus is investigating Templeton. I can't help but think that it's little things like that, something away from the main story line, something little more than distracting at this point, that will bring down other members of the show.

Bubbles talking to Fletcher seemed like a throwaway at first, but then I got to thinking - what if he feels comfotable enough to tell Fletcher about Sherrod? Bubbles finally tells his story, Fletcher puts it in the paper, and the Sun wins a Pulitzer over it.

Still not sure how Omar's going to pull this one off without some kind of backup. Where the heck's Renaldo???

In a way, I'm going to be disappointed if there's not some kind of climactic confrontation between Omar and Chris and Snoop. I don't see any way that all three of them survive the series. Marlo? Who knows.

In a way, it would fit this show's way of doing the unexpected if Marlo goes down in some way for the 22 (25) dead before Freamon breaks the clock code. If the lies and decit and amoral behavior are foiled by solid police work by Bunk and Kima, it would be the ultimate thumbing of the nose.

I vaguely remember at the beginning of the season some article with a quote by Simon that at least one person gets out of the series with his morality intact. I would have been betting on Sydnor, but that's gone now. Who's left?

Great episode, and the season is starting to inch its way up toward the list of favorites. I've always thought season 3 (Hamsterdam) was my favorite, followed in order by seasons 4, 1, and 2. This one wasn't appreoaching it until the last two or three episodes.

Even if it stays last on the list, it's still (to me) better than the best season of any other show on television.

Steve said...

My question about this episode- how exactly did Clay Davis' entire indictment, trial, and acquittal take place within the span of 2-3 weeks? You'd think a case that took years to make would have months in between the indictment and the start of trial, and that the trial would last much longer.

Vince Fumo, a state senator in PA who is pretty much the Italian-American Clay Davis, was indicted on corruption charges almost a year ago, and it still isn't anywhere near trial.

I get the impression that time this season has passed roughly a week or less per episode, especially since Prop Joe's murder, which happened two episodes earlier, is described to Bunk as having taken place "the other night." So how'd the trial happen so quickly?

Ben Guest said...

"I vaguely remember at the beginning of the season some article with a quote by Simon that at least one person gets out of the series with his morality intact"

I would say either Bunk or Bubbles.

Justin85 said...

As for the trial being so close to the indictment process. The episode earlier in the season covered opening day for the Orioles so that would be early April. The helicopter camera when all the cops swarmed where the cell phone call was made said it was July 10th. So at least three months have passed between then and now.

Justin85 said...

And Clay Davis's attorney was of course a prominent Baltimore attorney: http://www.billymurphylaw.com/

Does The Wire even cast actors anymore? It's now become a game of "I bet he's somebody" whenever a new character is introduced.

chicken biscuit said...

After a strong comeback last week for Omar in his one-man (and one-legged)mission to get at Marlo, I'm back to being convinced he won't survive the season as each week he compromises his code in progressively worse ways.
In episode 6 it was the use of obscenity, calling Marlo a bitch in order to draw him out.
In episode 7 he makes the seemingly on-the-fly decision to kill Savino, violating (I'm pretty sure for the first time)his promise to Bunk. Later he clarifies his new interpretation of the rules when tells Michael that he is (only) going to kill Marlo's muscle-- indicating the justification he has given himself for this latest compromise. How long before he decides it's okay to kill "civilians" and goes after Chris' family? Like McNulty, in breaking the rules Omar is on the slippery slope of becoming as amoral as Marlo- and now we're starting to see how these actions are catching up with both Mcnulty and Omar. The former is now facing the destruction of his career/life as his fake serial killer becomes subject to more scrutiny than it can probably stand up to, while latter is looking more and more mortal as his war of attrition takes it's toll in his body and his mind. As Omar hobbles away from Michael's corner Kenard is unimpressed, saying: "THAT'S Omar?"
Most of Omar's success lies in the fear that his name provokes. How many times have we seen Omar collect a stash without even having to pull out his sawed-off? Just the calls of "Omar comin'" were enough, but I think this scene shows that those days are ending...
I'm not saying he won't finish things with Marlo and/or Chris and Snoop, but I'd be shocked if he's also able to walk(or hobble) away into the sunset.

This seems to be one of the "big" questions this season (if not the entire series): "Is it acceptable to compromise your values in order to do what you think is right?"

I'm guessing David Simon says no

Algernon said...

Since this is the last episode I've seen, I've been eager to speculate:

What does Clay Davis's acquittal mean for the other plotlines and characters in the show? Obviously he's going to cause trouble for Carcetti, and he's ruined Bond which will help Nareese's mayoral ambitions. I expect that somehow Davis and Nareese will end up bringing down Daniels as well (she has that file...).

Also, Omar's casual murder of Savino was chilling.

Anonymous said...

This and episode 4 have been the best of the season. And 2 of the best episodes in the series run. Nice job by Dominic West directing. 3 and a half more hours left can't wait.

television inspection club said...

As Omar hobbles away from Michael's corner Kenard is unimpressed, saying: "THAT'S Omar?"

I didn't like THAT at all. I also didn't understand why it was that the kids just let Omar hobble away like that.

Bubbles talking to Fletcher seemed like a throwaway at first, but then I got to thinking - what if he feels comfotable enough to tell Fletcher about Sherrod?

I like this idea very much. But even if Bubs doesn't tell Fletcher about Sherrod, this was the first episode the entire season where Bubs seemed more like himself. I know that S1-4 Bubs was a junkie, but he was a cheerful guy. This whole season, he has been closed and withdrawn. It was nice to see him reaching out. I was really moved when he turned down Fletcher's money (in contrast to previous episodes). I'm hoping Bubs and Kima get to have a reunion - a joyful one.

Did anyone else notice Michael echoing McNulty's famous line "What the f**k* did I do?" when Carver pulled up to take him down to the station?

Mr. Chimp said...

"I vaguely remember at the beginning of the season some article with a quote by Simon that at least one person gets out of the series with his morality intact"

It was Syndor that Simon referenced, if I call correctly. I thought about this as well, but I don't believe that Syndor is in the serial-killer-fairy-tale loop -more likely that he's going with Lester on the wiretap thinking that the re-up on the wire flows from surplus from McNulty's "real" serial killer case.

Did you see the previews for Episode 8? Looks like McNulty's bringing in Kima the hard way.

Also, excellent pacing - I relish going back for the secondary details, especially on how Gus is piecing together a case against Scott's BS. Worth a second viewing.

Andrew said...

I didn't like THAT at all. I also didn't understand why it was that the kids just let Omar hobble away like that.

Well, Omar had two guns and they had zero. It seems like the most logical move to let him go.

quipu said...

Was it just me, or is Omar perhaps playing up the leg a little bit?

I noticed that when making his first explosive raid, and when he killed Savino, he didn't really need the broom, and seemed to limp at an even pace from both scenes, whilst, when sending a message through Michael's corner, he was propping himself up with the broom. Is this some sort of psychological ploy that Omar is using to draw Marlo out?

Anonymous said...

I recall Simon referencing Sydnor as the only one to make it out clean, too. Whether he knows about the connection to the "serial killer" or not (I don't think he does), the first scene of this episode shows him every bit as culpable as McNulty and Lester, IMHO. He knew it, too; you could tell by the way he walked away.

Anonymous said...

It was a nice touch having McNulty recommend IKEA furniture to Kima, considering that he stuggled to assemble an IKEA bed in Season 1 and was obviously setting her up for similar frustration.

vadmspartan said...

Surprised no one's mentioned it but I really enjoyed Richard Belzer's cameo in the bar as Gus came in. He and Clark Johnson (the guy who plays Gus) were characters in David Simon's first show Homicide. It was also funny seeing him sit at the same bar as the real Jay Landsman, the guy all his character was based on. Pretty meta.

Anyway Clay Davis proved no legal system can stop him from helping the people. He can go back to working that faucet.

Omar has definitely fallen off the edge, he's broken his code many times over. He just wants to strike back at Marlo at any cost. A one man army, but his level of success will be in doubt.

McNulty has built himself one hell of a house of cards. He's lost control of his own plan. Also I was thinking, if the newspaper released the pictures of the missing homeless man, wouldn't it be possible that someone in Richmond might see it? I don't know, their too many variables now for McNulty to control.

childermass said...

As Omar hobbles away from Michael's corner Kenard is unimpressed, saying: "THAT'S Omar?"

I wonder if Kenard will be the one to go after Omar now? I still think Omar dies this season and I don't think it will be by Chris, Snoop, or Marlo.

Fluffy said...

I think we've seen the blueprint for how McNulty will get away with his fake serial killer in the Clay Davis trial. The parallel between Clay Davis and McNulty is clear: they both have done something unequivocally immoral and illegal, but they have shared their wealth and they are both loved by their peers. Just as Clay Davis did not get convicted by a jury of his peers, neither will McNulty. (That's my guess anyway, not based on any knowledge of future episodes.)

The Clay Davis trial was a pretty damn brilliant piece of writing too. No witnesses that change their testimony under cross examination, no "Has the jury reached a verdict?", or any other courtroom drama tropes. Instead, Clay Davis takes the stand and makes no effort to deny any of the facts that Lester and Sydnor have uncovered over months of investigative work. Even though the facts should be incontrovertible, he has the better story.

The only way to take down Clay Davis now is for Bond to hand over the mortgage fraud charge to the US Attorney. Since he didn't use that charge, Clay Davis can still be tried on it, and perhaps if the case played out in a different venue (in federal court for one thing), he might get convicted or take a plea agreement. But that would be a double defeat for Bond: not only did he personally fail to make the original charges stick, he'd be handing a possible victory to a political rival. If he's like any typical Wire figure, he'll try to let this story fade away quietly.

Fluffy said...

I'm not suggesting that Clay Davis actually did what he claimed in court. I'm sure he pocketed 99% of that money himself. It would have been sufficient if he set a few hundred dollars aside to do the good deeds he claimed to have done.

television inspection club said...

Well, Omar had two guns and they had zero. It seems like the most logical move to let him go.

I guess I just assumed that at least someone on the corner had a gun.

Chris Metz said...

Omar took their gun...and I don't think they carry on their person on the corner because it would be easy to get sent up on a gun charge.

Speaking of a gun charge, I still think that will play a part in the end of Chris and Snoop. I remember reading an article by Ed Burns about how a simple gun charge was the most common way to get people like Chris and Snoop off the street.

Alan Sepinwall said...

I guess I just assumed that at least someone on the corner had a gun.

Spider had a gun in the wheel well of a car, and Omar took it before he could get to it. (No one carries a gun on their person on a corner, as that would be automatic grounds for arrest.) By picking up every gun he comes across, Omar's built up quite the arsenal over the last two episodes.

Anonymous said...

In response to the question about Omar faking the limp, it is possible that his broken leg is getting worse, as he's not received any medical attention.

Is it possible that Simon leaves some very big questions about this season's story unanswered?

From Bunk's interview with Michael it's fair to assume that his step-father abused him, explaining Michael's hatred from S4. It would also explain his skepticism of Cutty, and probably any other older men.

I wasn't so sure about this season until ep. 6 and now I'm really hooked. This is the first season I've watched as the episodes come out and while it's tremendously difficult to wait between episodes, it is nice to experience my favorite show in a new way.

television inspection club said...

Spider had a gun in the wheel well of a car, and Omar took it before he could get to it. (No one carries a gun on their person on a corner, as that would be automatic grounds for arrest.)

Thank you. My first viewing of each episode occurs at midnight on Sunday, and last night I was particularly tired. It's nice to have fellow-viewers to fill in the details!

come at the king said...

Just watched the scene from S1 where Savino and Levy have the bag of baking soda on the table and Levy says, "the best you can do is a max of three years". And then Elein Nathan says "A cop got shot behind this, it'll be the full three". So yeah it was just an "arm and hammer charge" as Avon put it, and I asssume Savino got the full three so it would make sense for him to be out now.

From Bunk's interview with Michael it's fair to assume that his step-father abused him, explaining Michael's hatred from S4. It would also explain his skepticism of Cutty, and probably any other older men.

Wasn't this all made very clear way before Bunk's interview? I came to that assumption almost immediately after Bug's daddy came into the picture.

Also could we not talk about the previews for next week's episode here? Those are spoilers, no? I avoid those previews for a reason.

JP said...

In the directors commentary during the montage at the end of season 4, David Simon makes it clear that Michael was abused by his stepfather, and Chris had been abused in his history as well. The line by Chris "no matter what they did, you can look them in the eye now" is the key line.

BEC said...

I won't reference any specifics from the previews, but I think the Wire does the best job in television of misleading the audience with their previews. And while I don't have the willpower to not watch them, they give away very little in terms of the story.

I agree with fluffy, I think McNulty gets away with it. He might have to face the damage he's done to others - the homeless, their families, good po-lice, but I sure don't see him going to jail. Not with the mayor on board.

It seems like people are putting to much into Omar's code too. Like, I can't beleive he cursed! Please - he is calling Marlo out. He was right to kill Savino. Now there's one less soldier to worry about. His code is still there. He's not profiting from any of this - he's blowing up money and flushing drugs. His code forces him to revenge Butchie. Omar tried to keep his promise to Bunk but when Butchie was tortured and murdered, he had no choice.

SJ said...

Congrats to The Wire's writing staff for winning best dramatic series at the WGA awards (my other favorite show 30 Rock won best comedy).

vadmspartan said...

I think Michael will be the one to kill Omar. Omar made the mistake of not recognizing him at the corner. I also think it would be a good bookend for Chris, Snoop, and Marlo to be taken out by some other circumstance and have Michael come out on top. It's a little too perfect but anything's possible.

emul said...

Haven't seen any previews, but I will keep my fingers crossed that Lester gets in touch with Prez to figure out the clock code.

Also--I cannot WAIT for the next 3 episodes. The last 3 are always the greatest. Having watched (devoured) all previous seasons on DVD, I don't know how it will be stretching them out over the weeks!

Matt Zoller Seitz said...

vadmspartan: "I think Michael will be the one to kill Omar."

Maybe, but a friend of mine is betting it'll be Dukie, an ill fit with the corner life who was recently tutored by Michael on the fine art of putting a man down. Kind of a "Wild Bunch" touch.

Who knows how it'll shake out -- what with Simon taking things into the realm of the comedic/fanciful this season, he might let Omar live.

Also: The "Goodnight Moon" monologue is the fourth bit to appear on "The Wire" that also appeared in Richard Prices' "Clockers." However, Simon says Price raided his own work at the request of the "Wire" writing staff, all of whom are fans of "Clockers."

Anonymous said...

Can we please not talk about the previews for the next episode, some of us try to avoid those.

Algernon said...

I've been trying to figure out how this season fits together on a thematic level. It's a bit easier to draw broad lessons about institutions and the system from Hamsterdam or the story of the four kids, than from the story of the fake serial killer. I'm sure everything will be much clearer by the end of the season, but here's some speculation while we wait:

As any Wire fan knows, the first scene of the season is supposed to lay out the season's major themes. This season opener was the lie detector/copy machine scene with the line, "the bigger the lie, the more they believe." We've had a lot of lies in this season: Jimmy's serial killer, Lester's illegal wiretap, Templeton's fabulism, Clay Davis's bravura jury performance, and (sort of) Carcetti's newfound interest in homelessness.

It's very interesting and surprising that, for the Wire's final season, Simon seems to be unfavorably contrasting our favorite system buckers Jimmy and Lester with the by-the-book Bunk and Kima. I mean, this episode paralleled Clay's ability to bamboozle a jury with Jimmy's ability to bamboozle the whole city -- you're not in good company there, Jimmy. When Kima said "Good night scammers" at the end of the episode, it could apply to Jimmy, Lester, Templeton, Clay, and Carcetti. I shouldn't accuse the Wire of being moralistic, since the show has always avoided easy answers. But we have reached the point where Alan is calling Jimmy a "villain," so I'm pretty sure we're supposed to believe that Jimmy and Lester are clearly in the wrong.

Fletcher's meeting with (and subsequent story about?) Bubbles might help clear up the message of the season, since he's told to write "what feels true." I suspect his truth will be drowned out by McNulty and Templeton's BS -- we definitely seem to be headed toward an ending where McNulty gets away with it. Maybe something about how our society doesn't want the truth, similar to Season 3's "We fight on that lie" ending. But does all this business about truth and lies tie into the Omar/Marlo drama? I have no idea...

lls said...

MUNCH!
munch and ikea were definitely my favorite parts of the episode. The light hearted moments are always enjoyable.

I agree that one episode on the Davis trial seemed odd. However the speed does help to underscore the frustration that all that work ended in nothing.

I only have a few questions:

Do you think we'll ever find out more about the leak?

Why is Lance Reddick's waist so small?

And at this point, if you could "save" any Wire character, who would it be? Meaning at the end of the run, who do you most want to see in a good place-headed in a good direction?

come at the king said...

But does all this business about truth and lies tie into the Omar/Marlo drama? I have no idea...

I think it does to a certain extent. Marlo lied to the co-op about how it was Omar who took out Joe and Hungry. And now Omar is using street talk, the corner boy's way of getting news, to talk shit on the Stanfield organization. I'm beginning to think that the Junebug killing in the beginning of the season was thrown in there to show how much Marlo cares about his name on the street. And now Omar is going after his name, callin Marlo a bitch.

I won't reference any specifics from the previews, but I think the Wire does the best job in television of misleading the audience with their previews. And while I don't have the willpower to not watch them, they give away very little in terms of the story.

Well I donno about all that. I would have loved to watch episode 2 without knowing that Avon was gonna suprise Marlo. Or watch episode 5 without knowing that Omar was indeed stepping into an ambush. Also I think that the HBO promo department handles the previews, not the production team from The Wire, otherwise I think they would be a lot different.

Chris Metz said...

I've been trying to figure out how this season fits together on a thematic level. It's a bit easier to draw broad lessons about institutions and the system from Hamsterdam or the story of the four kids, than from the story of the fake serial killer. I'm sure everything will be much clearer by the end of the season, but here's some speculation while we wait

I think it plays into the scene in episode six, where Bunk realizes there are 25 murders on Marlo, and no one really cares.

You have had a serial killer in Baltimore for over a year and a half but there are no big front page stories on it, there are no features on the victims. It was an idea right at the start of episode 3 and played around with earlier than that with the Carcetti meeting with Rawls and Burrell. (That's not a headline we want to see).

The press isn't exactly doing their job. If there were headlines and major stories about how a serial killer was killing young black men, the city would have to fund an investigation into it. Instead there were going to be stories about schools and other platitudes.

Along comes McNultys fake killer. Lester was right in how to get them interested, but they shouldn't have had to get interested in the first place. The media should be a check on those with power but instead they are chasing stories that are sexy that they think will sell and win awards.

With that said, McNulty should have just called the paper on the fact they shut down the Marlo investigation...but that didn't happen..

dcdame said...

Loved the Richard Belzer cameo. I read somewhere that it wasn't clear whether he was appearing as Munch, but the his dialogue sure left little room for doubt ("I used to own a bar"), not to mention the appearance of Lt. Mello (the real Jay Landsman) in the scene.

So I hope this gets added to the record # of Munch appearances on different TV shows.

Zach Haldeman said...

This was a great episode, and Dominic West did a good job of directing, even if it wasn't the typical style of the show. I can't believe the entire series is somehow going to resolve itself in just three episodes. Usually with three episodes left in the season I'm only dumbfounded about how they're going to tie up the main case, namely the Barksdale investigation in season one, or how Hamsterdam was going to come to an end in season three. But this time the arc has so many loose threads and there are so many characters that it looks impossible for anyone to come up with a satisfying conclusion to the show, although I don't doubt David Simon & co.'s ability to do it.

What especially has concerned me lately is whether or not we'll get to see curtain calls for Prez and especially Bunny Colvin, my favorite character in the series. It seems like they could work Prez into the story in two ways: Dukie seeks him out or he's brought in by Lester to help solve the clock puzzle. As for Bunny, I will be so upset if David Simon can't find a way to squeeze him (and for that matter, Namond) into the series finale. True, he got a great sendoff in season four, but I want so badly to see him one last time.

Tim Masterson said...

What especially has concerned me lately is whether or not we'll get to see curtain calls for Prez and especially Bunny Colvin, my favorite character in the series.

It would be almost corny, but I wouldn't mind if there was a 30 minutes "afterword" show. Just a rundown of what happened to everybody from the five seasons. Prez, Bunny, Namond, Ziggy, etc...

I'm not expecting it, but I'd like to see it.

Andrew said...

To be honest I'm happier not to see characters I love, like Prez and Bunny. It means that misery can't be heaped upon them. Seeing Randy again, another character that I love, was heartbreaking.

Jeremiah said...

So is Sydnor in on the serial killer plot now? Last episode, Lester told him it was "hard to say" how the killer connected to Marlo. But this episode, he's helping them fake the phone call by having the killer's cell phone be tracked to the harbor. What did he think he was doing if he wasn't explicitly told the details??

Algernon said...

It seems like they could work Prez into the story in two ways

Here's another, much more painful way. In this episode, some guy dealing with the school budget told Carcetti he was going to have to have teacher layoffs if the serial killer investigation continued. What if McNulty's lie leads to Prez losing his job? I think that might be too mean even for this show...

Happy Contrarian said...

Perhaps the most depressing part of this season has been the fall of my favorite characters - Omar, McNulty and Freamon. I'd rather remember them as they were in seasons 1-4.

Omar.

In Season 4, Omar was stalking Marlo with Renaldo. Renaldo pointed out Michael to Omar and Omar responded that Michael was "just a kid". I always feared that that line foreshadowed Omar's demise at the hands of Michael. And it would be very Wire-esque to have Marlo/Chris fall, only to have Michael take over. Well, if Michael took out Omar then that would go a long way to establishing Michael's street cred.

Of course, it could be someone else that takes down Omar (if in fact he is taken down). I had a dream recently that the LA Lakers would win the NBA title this year. The next day, they acquired Pau Gasol in a trade. That same week, I had a dream that a young hopper (it might have been Kenard) took out Omar (yes, I've been dreaming about The Wire). I hate the Lakers but am a huge Omar fan so I hope never dream comes true.

Filipe said...

I would've been very surprised if Bunny and Prez doesn't have their curtain calls (as I would if we doesn't check out with a few others like Poot, hell, I'd guess some contrivance to include a Wee-Bay scene might happen).

Filipe said...

As for how Omar/Marlo war ties in the main theme, as someone has mention it has to do with how no one truly cares. Also a lot of the season is dealing with different forms of lies and storytelling and one could argue that "Omar, the urban legend" - which is clearly falling apart - ties with that.


One last thing. Alan, if you are planning to do any sort of post-mortem interview with Simon, could you ask him wheter Prez or Cutty were victims of the shorter season? Bunny got a pretty clear end last year (an one might argue that to some level Cutty got one as well), but Prez final scene last season didn't suggest that he would be MIA this season.

thomas roz said...

the impaired homeless man whose picture was sent to the baltimore sun is still alive. that has to be mcnulty's downfall. after all, mcnulty personally dropped him off to that shelter, and regardless of how many miles it is from baltimore, if his picture is plastered all over the newspaper and evening news as the "serial killer's" red ribbon target, you'd have to suspect that someone, somewhere would recognize him. and eventually, that will be traced back to mcnulty dropping him off at the shelter -- an act witnessed by the woman who received his ID -- which is a lie jimbo can't talk his way out of. that can't be ignored by simon. that has to be his downfall -- regardless of templeton's lies being exposed at some point -- right?

Anonymous said...

Thomas, I don't think it will be that straightforward. Nothing is ever quite that simple on The Wire. Look at what led to Herc's demise in season 4: he clearly had it coming, but it took Burrell to personally go through the General Orders to find something to nail him with. Besides, McNulty said that if Larry ever makes his way back to Baltimore, it will be written off as a frat-boy prank. The fact that McNulty is not worried about any of this is perhaps the most troubling aspect here. If McNulty goes down -- and I'm not so sure he will -- it will likely be over something unrelated. But for that to happen, somebody has to complain, and somebody else has to notice. I don't see any of McNulty's colleagues complaining (except that Bunk none too pleased), they all seem to be happy about the overtime and the opportunity to do real police work. And I don't see anybody noticing, since Scott at The Sun is complicit in the lie and his bosses love the Dickensian aspect of the homelessness story. I think we're headed in a deeply ironic direction, where the biggest lie is likely to go undetected.

richard rollins said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Alan Sepinwall said...

People! Which part of "Do not talk about any future episodes" do you not understand?

beef said...

I missed the comments, but that means episode 8 is out there somewhere...off to TPB :D

Jack Shaftoe said...

I was so excited to post my insightful comment that McNulty's balancing the evil of his off-the-books investigation with the good of helping his fellow cops do actual police work paralleled nicely with Clay Davis' justification for taking cash to help out his constituents. But then I get here and see several people have already made that point. Darn you Alan for having such a brilliant bunch of followers.

I will add that although you all reminded me of the call-back to McNulty's struggles with an IKEA bed in season 1, I still thought going to a frustrated Kima twice was too pat and not at all Wire-like. It seemed like a mediocre sitcom tactic.

As for where we go from here, I see a final scene in the final episode of McNulty behind bars, grabbing a seat in the chow hall next to Avon. They've set up McNulty and Templeton to both take falls for their sins.

daveshac said...

I loved the Goodnight Moon scene. Seemed like that could have been the "wrap" scene for Kima's character except that we know she'll continue to play a role in the homeless murders since Landesman has her digging into victim backgrounds.

Did anyone follow the "hypothetical" question that Gus was posing to Mello at the bar? It was split across two scenes but it was something about twins or women or something. I couldn't really follow it and I forgot to go back and rewind. I'm sure Gus is digging in on Templeton somehow but I didn't connect the dots.

I guess the nice thing about the clock code is that once they break it, they'll know the time and place of the re-supply shipment. However, the best they can probably do there is stage a huge raid, put drugs on the table, and make a few headlines. Not sure that with three episodes left that Freamon will have the wherewithall to surveil the drug shipments all the way back up to the Greek.

television inspection club said...

Did anyone follow the "hypothetical" question that Gus was posing to Mello at the bar? It was split across two scenes but it was something about twins or women or something. I couldn't really follow it and I forgot to go back and rewind. I'm sure Gus is digging in on Templeton somehow but I didn't connect the dots.

I had trouble with that too. I thought he was asking about the sister using the other sister's I.D. to cash checks -- like the story he asked Templeton to follow up on -- and Mello was telling him that it's not possible fo someone to fake that, once their fingerprints are in the system. So yes, I think he was trying to ferret out Templeton's lie.

I still thought going to a frustrated Kima twice was too pat and not at all Wire-like.

Agreed! Nice observation. That bothered me, too. Besides which, I figured Kima could get an IKEA furniture together, at least after a try or two!

Anonymous said...

Gus was backtracking the story of the crab cake/ 'check kiting' sister so he will have dirt on that smarmy scott come next week.

mywaydimag said...

Even though it's been compelling I'm still having a problem with the realism of this season. Specifically, why would either Lester or McNulty actually think that such a plan would work to bring down Marlo? Even if they're able to get real evidence they won't be able to go to court with it since:
1. The cell # was illegally obtained.
2. The warrant they had was for a serial killer, not for Marlo Stanfield. Seems like a defense attorney's dream.

thomas roz said...

I think we're headed in a deeply ironic direction, where the biggest lie is likely to go undetected.

You might be right, and I wouldn't have a problem with that because some people who spin huge lies -- very public lies -- never get nailed. Clay Davis is a prime example on the political end. I was pleased to see that McNulty was genuinely shocked by how big the story had become, even to the point of being worried and asking Lester to wrap up, which is why I thought of his bringing Larry to the homeless shelter. Perhaps McNulty should have known, but he clearly underestimated how much play the story would get with Larry's red ribbon campaign, how much manpower he'd subsequently get once the no overtime edict was dropped, how many requests he'd get for real police work, etc. So the minor detail of keeping Larry alive and having someone recognize him, then notifying Baltimore police, at which time McNulty could (and should) get nailed, would seem to be floating out there. But you're right, someone has to notice it first. In the 24-7 news cycle, I can't imagine that SOMEONE wouldn't recognize Larry's face on TV or in print -- after all, Nancy Grace was already interviewing Scott -- and the dots would start to connect from the shelter. It even seemed like he was somewhat known in Baltimore for his public panhandling.

Alan Sepinwall said...

It's the Fuzzy Dunlop scheme all over again: Lester's going to take whatever intelligence he gathers from his illegal wiretap, credit it to a phony CI, and then use that intel to obtain legal warrants.

At least, that's the plan.

Donny said...

re Daniels:

I can't believe only one person has mentioned this and no one else has followed up. Why does Daniels look like an alien??? Has Lance Reddick vowed to give up food for life? I swear I couldn't even look at him in those scenes at their apartment. He has a 4 inch waste and a huge alien head.

Sorry to go off about that, but when I watched the episode last night that stuck in my head and I wanted to make it a point to bring it up.

Fantastic episode. I loved how in yesterday's recap of episode 6, all the commenters were attacking McNulty and jumping ship. I can't wait to hear their reactions now. I couldn't help but feel scared for him with all this publicity...but at least he's making friends.

Fantastic job of directing by West!

Anonymous said...

Regarding Clay Davis's speedy trial -- I believe Bond intentionally sped it up, and even cut down on the witnesses so it would go quicker.

I am shocked that, two days later, nobody is talking about the watch code.

I'm thinking that the code has something to do with the second hand, since all of the watches shown, even the digital ones, had seconds which were exactly on a number.

I also noticed that a lot of them, the second hand was pointing right at the 7. And every digital watch shown, the seconds were "35".

I'm not sure what this means -- but I'm sure we're all going to kick ourselves when the code is revealed, because it has to be incredibly simple.

Anybody have any other thoughts?

Donny said...

One other thing:

No one has commented on McNulty's fake call to Scott - hahaha. That had me laughing out loud. I literally burst into laughter when McNulty was at the Sun and Scott said something like "and then at the end, he told me he wanted to bite ME" - and McNulty did a little eyebrow raise - hahahaha classic!!

Bob Reinquist said...

When Kenard said, "That’s Omar?" a chill ran down my spine. Despite his fairly small role, Kenard has been established as an extremely cold blooded little kid. He seems to possess none of the youthful innocence that we saw in Randy, Namond, Dukie, and Michael and he is even younger than they were. I would not be surprised if he ends up killing Omar which would certainly demonstrate one on Simon's favorite themes: the cyclical nature of the game.

Anonymous said...

I was checking the HBO schedule, and the final episode is in fact, 90 minutes. However, it appears that they will not be airing the finale early on demand, which kind of sucks if that is the case. One weird coincidence, the finale is scheduled for March 9, which is the same day that Notorious BIG was shot.

Colin said...

Anyone else notice that Clay refers to Bond as "Prosecutor O-Bond-A"?? HILARIOUS!!

I believe I called it after Ep. 2 aired a few weeks ago, but obvi Clay got off. That man is just too damn slick...sheeeeeeeeet!

Also, for a Dominic West-directed episode, there was a helluva lot of McNutty in there. You would think they would have withheld a few of his scenes in favor of one with Marlo, Chris, Snoop??? Come on mang, spread the wealth! Also, Dom West poking fun at his Balmurr accent was a nice touch.

Brian said...

So if Belzer is appearing as Munch, is the entire series occurring in Tommy Westphall's mind?

jiggga said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Zach Haldeman said...

I want to let all the Nostradamus wannabe predictors know that some of us are aware of the (hopefully fake) scene(s) that were leaked last week and aren't impressed with your "deep insight" into The Wire.

I had no idea that people had leaked scenes. Alan, if people are posting spoilers in the guise of predictions, you really need to do something. Since you, I'm sure, wouldn't watch scenes that were leaked so you could catch said people, the only thing I can think of is to prohibit any discussion of things to come. The problem is that makes it a lot more difficult to comment on things. But if what the above poster said is true, I (and I'm sure many others) will have to stop reading the comments.

jiggga said...

Zach, I deleted my last comment because I figured it might do more harm than good. Sometimes ignorance is bliss, and I don't want to destroy the comentary over my own petty annoyances. Sorry for even broaching the subject.

Anonymous said...

I loved Clay Davis mispronouncing Aeschylus to an audience of reporters.

Doug said...

I loved Clay Davis mispronouncing Aeschylus to an audience of reporters.

He mispronounced Prometheus too.

Anonymous said...

"Despite his fairly small role, Kenard has been established as an extremely cold blooded little kid. He seems to possess none of the youthful innocence that we saw in Randy, Namond, Dukie, and Michael and he is even younger than they were."

I agree. It's not suprising, since Kenard has apparently been out on the street on his own from an extremely young age. Randy, Namond, Dukie, and Michael all had it tough to varying degrees (financially, not so much Namond), but none of them were as deep in the street game as Kenard was at that young of an age.

lls said...

donny- at first I was excited that you too were appalled by lance reddick's waist. then I clicked on your name and became appalled for other reasons.

also I'm not sure that I really want mcnulty to get away with it all. sure he's playing robin hood, and trying to bring down marlo, but his immoral route to get there might have me rooting against our main character. i guess this is hbo and not tv.

floretbroccoli said...

I loved Lester's complimenting McNulty on his old school BMore accent, and McNulty's giving credit for it to his "heritage." I wonder if that was West, as director and actor, acknowledging that his accent has been less than authentic.

I've got my fingers crossed that Lester will need Prez's help in breaking the clock code.

water said...

vadmspartan said...
I think Michael will be the one to kill Omar. Omar made the mistake of not recognizing him at the corner.


i agree...i think mike will in fact kill omar...and why you ask? check it....

think back to season 4 when mike finally makes the decision to have marlo and co. help him with his problems at home.....

he goes into the courtyard to have a sit down with marlo and who watches from the window? omar....he comments to renaldo, "he's just a kid."...and the episode ends right there....

something tells me that was foreshadowing....this is just a wild hunch....ever since i saw that episode i felt like that moment was poignant to the story....and it always stuck with me....

...great points/anaysis all around everyone...i thourughly enjoy reading everyone's take and always walk away feeling like i've learned something in the process...

...lol @ all the complaining.....i understand that "just trusting the writers" is a little silly and no one is above critical analysis but jeez lighten up and cut 'em some slack....at least until the final episode goes to black because something tells me they will wrap everything nicely...patience.....

trob said...

vadmspartan said:

Omar has definitely fallen off the edge.... He just wants to strike back at Marlo at any cost.


I hate to say it because he's my favorite character, but Omar--Ahab.

As for who survives, of the major characters who have been challenged to breach their ethics, seems to me that only Bunk has passed the test.

David Hellman said...

That hunch about Michael being the one to finally "touch" Omar seems like it could happen.

Zach Haldeman, you said this episode, which was directed by Dominic West, had a different style from the others. To help me focus on that and see what you do, could you describe what seemed different?

Baltimore Chick said...

"And Clay Davis's attorney was of course a prominent Baltimore attorney: http://www.billymurphylaw.com"

Murphy also ran a limited campaign for Baltimore's Mayor in the 80's. He's the perfect lawyer for a Clay Davis type, as his reputation is uh...tainted (at best). OK-he's corrupt, but never prosecuted.

Omar's untreated (possible broken) leg, may be his downfall. All sorts of infections can develop if left untreated. It makes no sense that he wouldn't travel the 45 minutes to PA. or Delaware to get checked out by a Dr., and if needed-a cast & REAL CRUTCHES. His Boyfriend could provide the transportation. Or is boyfriend being hid for his own protection?

Minor nick pick-This show has (to my knowledge), the longest opening theme song of any current show. Between the recap & the ( way too long opening theme), they're taking up valuable time for actual current story lines.

Logan said...

Yeah, but the show runs a full hours. Compare that to The Sopranos, which never runs a full 59 minutes and is often in the low 50s, or something like Entourage, which runs about 23 minutes.

I'll take the longer credits if it gets me that too.

Anonymous said...

straight outta silver spring said...

another positivie about the long opening, BmoreChick, is that there are NO credits running while the show is in action.

trob, I wonder if Bunk is going to be tempted when he sees all the good police work being done by the other detectives with the money Jimmy is getting from homeless murders? What about Kima?

Anonymous said...

here is someone of a side question: Whatever happened to the cop who was featured fairly promininently in Season 4? This is the crooked cop who breaks Donut's fingers after he steals the car. Also, he is the one who Michael and the crew threw paint on. Maybe he got fired and I forgot that. It's probably just a case of a minor character not returning.

Tim Masterson said...

Question heading into the final three:

Is there any way McNulty/Lester can get away with it? Is it too late? Would Bunk solving the murders in the vacants be enough of a distraction?

Anonymous said...

"Whatever happened to the cop who was featured fairly promininently in Season 4?"

I'd like to believe that a now-conscientious Carver, the Sergeant in Charge of the Western District, either fired Walker or transferred him out of the Western.

That might just be hope. I would say that he wouldn't fit into any of the Western stuff we've seen so far -- we don't sympathize with him, so him complaining about no OT would be pointless [don't think he was in that scene] -- and he would've just complicated the "Collichio is racist" scene.

Anonymous said...

Anyone else think the Omar-Michael scene was one of the most horrible of the season? By horrible, I mean for the characters involved, not horribly executed or written or anything like that. First Omar shoots Savino based on an impulsive decision (another great-yet-horrible, shocking scene). Then he sticks up Michael's crew looking like some apparition out of an Edgar Allen Poe story. Now I'm not sure, but I think that he used a pet name (something like sweet thing, or something similar) for Michael when they were sitting together and gave Mike an up and down look-over--given Michael's history of sexual abuse at the hands of an older man, it made the scene that much more painful to watch. The Omar that remains is barely a shadow of his former self in many ways. I'm glad that Simon has the intenstinal fortitude to go to these very dark places this season. While much of the season has been very funny, those parts probably need to be to offset some of these devastating scenes, like McNulty-Larry and Omar-Michael.

Speaking of the funnier scenes, I think I finally like Scott. He's just a dim-bulbed sap, and McNulty turning the tables on him has him in such a state of disarray I can't help but feel for him (just a little)...Like when they asked him if the voice from McNulty's call was the same as the first one and he goes "Yes....no....I mean yes..."

Anonymous said...

And by the way, the following exchange from today's congressional hearing on steroids in baseball vindicates, to me, Simon's extremist tactics in expressing to us the message that socially and politically, we pay attention to all the wrong stories:

Rep Tom Davis: "Mr. Clemens, do you recall bleeding through your pants in 2001?"

Roger Clemens: "I do not."

Anonymous said...

all i wanna know is "where's poot?"
i'd like to see wee-bay, and naymond. i'd was hoping omar would reach out to brother mouzone to deal with marlo. after all after cashing in on stealing the connect he had the funds to hire him.

Indeed said...

I think somebody said earlier that too much is being made about Omar's code and its significance. True, it was a defining characteristic, but we're now dealing with a man who has simply gone off the rails in his quest for vengeance. Still, having said that, his killing of Savino was very difficult to watch. I'm still rooting for Omar...but it's getting much harder to do that.
I see Michael taking down Marlo. I think he may understand that Omar does not plan to rest until Marlo pays.

It occured to me today that one of the things I'm missing most this season is the Bunk/McNulty relationship. Obviously the reason is storyline, but I hate seeing them at such odds.

It was wonderful to see Bubbles demonstrate a bit of humour and laughter. Oh my god, David Simon, please let Bubbles make it out of this season alive and on track!

A few weeks ago I listed the characters I really want to see by season end. So far I've only gotten Randy.
Where's Bunny? Weebay? Brianna?

trob said...

Anonymous suggested that Kima also hasn't breached the ethical code of her profession. But I was raising the issue about those who had been tested. Unlike Bunk, Kima, hasn't been courted by McNulty to play along in the scam, so she hasn't been tested the same way.

Anonymous also expressed maybe finally liking Scott. I sure hope not. Scott didn't make some honest or naive mistake. He deliberately, on several occasions, it seems, fabricated stories (falsely implicating Daniels in once case) -- crossing a bright line for journalists. There is no excuse for that. He doesn't deserve to ever work as a journalist ever again.

Baltimore Chick said...

Not to beat a dead horse, but the L-O-N-G theme song is included in the show's total running time.

Random thoughts- I think Dookie gets out of the drug world. He's not cut out for it, and he knows it, as well as the other corner boys. He's smart, he'll find another "job".

There's a spoiler floating around about one of the show's many evil character's dying. I hope its true

McNulty's Baltimore "accent" was awful & way over the top. It was worse than that Cop's (Gus was talking to in the bar),"accent." Even John Travolta's horrible Baltimore accent in "Hairspray", was a (very) slight improvement over these two "impressions".

All that aside, I'm going to miss this show when it ends.

The Markitect said...

I think the thing to speculate is which lie is going to overshadow the other: Templeton's or McNulty's? If (and when) they're found out, which will ultimately do more damage to the other? I wonder if that is how the season would wind down. Say, perhaps, Templeton's lie comes out, it would take the heat off of the entire fake serial killer thing and maybe let McNulty scoot by. On the other hand, finding out the whole serial killer thing is a hoax could either put Templeton in the hot seat (for articles that seemingly have no truth to them), or let him off for merely reporting what he though was true.

Also, its sad to see Omar in the condition he is. I hope this isn't Simon's way of letting his audience down gradually before his ultimate demise. One thing is for sure and that is they typically favorite characters are not looking good right now. But, like others have mentioned, in the case of McNulty, we're all so disgusted with him, seeing him pay the repercussions might not leave such a bad taste in our mouths.

Also, I'm sure we have to see both Prez and Bunny by season's end. If we've been given a glimpse at Boris and Johnny 50, we have to get send offs from those two as well. I just hope it isn't just thrown into the ending montage (which I'm feeling so ambivalent about already; they are, of course, the highlight of every season, but this one will be the very last scene to enjoy).

For the sake of discussion, does anyone have any predictions on the clock codes? I noticed the faces were all slightly different, and, to me, that suggested what locations were being used. Using clocks, while I'm sure they have some meaning, could be a confusing way to simply complicate the deciphering process.

As for the comment above mine, I appreciate your speculation, but I'm not aware of this rumor floating around. In fact, I make a great effort to avoid reading such rumors (which is why I stay the hell away from IMDb messageboards and am really thankful for the environment Alan has provided). But, maybe we can all try to avoid throwing those kind of things out here for others to read.

Dennis said...

It seems like Simon's been setting up Omar's fall at Micheal's hands for awhile now; "he just a kid" being the first instance. But now with his reaction towards Mike and the Mike's history with his stepdad, isn't that too obvious a tact for Simon to employ?

As for Kennard's comment, you can read that in a lot of ways. I'll take it as an illustration of how Omar's lost his sh%t so to speak and in the process some of his image as well

cingersoll said...

regarding the clock codes, how about the hours hand represents the amount of the re-up. The minute and second hands are GPS coordinates -- once added to some baseline Baltimore coordinates. They punch the coordinates into a GPS devise on the phone.

Anonymous said...

I've got news for you, Baltimore Chick: The cop Gus is talking to in the bar is played by Jay Landsman -- yes, the real one -- and he is very much a Baltimore native and lifelong resident, not an impressionist.

Logan said...

Not to mention again to BMore chick, but take out the long theme song and it's still longer than the other HBO shows. And is it really necessary to say what that spoiler is, even if you're not mentioning any names?

Anonymous said...

B-More Chick got got!!

In yo' faaace!

Anonymous said...

"For the sake of discussion, does anyone have any predictions on the clock codes? I noticed the faces were all slightly different, and, to me, that suggested what locations were being used. Using clocks, while I'm sure they have some meaning, could be a confusing way to simply complicate the deciphering process."

The second hand is definitely important. On every non-digital watch, the second hand was pointing directly at a number. Further, that number was frequently a seven, and all of the digital watches had "35" as the seconds.

--Sean, too lazy to sign in

Anonymous said...

"I hated to see Omar break his code, though that's probably only been a matter of time. (If he had to go off on someone, it couldn't have been Kenard? Damn, that kid is obnoxious)."

Speaking of Kenard, isn't it funny how he never picks on Dukie in front of Michael? I guess he learned never to cross Michael after Mike beat him down in Season 4 for stealing Namond's stash.

Anonymous said...

Alan, I have heard that the series finale (Episode 10) will not be shown early On Demand like the other episodes have been. Is this true?

John said...

I normally wouldn't share this with anyone but since you guys are the most hardcore fans out there I give you this.
http://www.bustedtees.com/shirt/carcettiformayor/male

Anonymous said...

I've always wanted to make a "Frank Sobotka for Union Treasurer" shirt out of the posters, but I could never find a good copy of the picture they use.

Anonymous said...

"Anonymous also expressed maybe finally liking Scott. I sure hope not. Scott didn't make some honest or naive mistake. He deliberately, on several occasions, it seems, fabricated stories (falsely implicating Daniels in once case) -- crossing a bright line for journalists. There is no excuse for that. He doesn't deserve to ever work as a journalist ever again."

Yes, yes, he's a very bad person. So are a lot of my favorite characters on the Wire. What I'm talking about is that for six episodes he was just bland, but this episode his 'dear god what's happening to me' routine was so well done that I feel like he kind of has a personality now. So I like him more as a character. Maybe I'm just amoral, but I'll take a well-drawn bad guy over a cardboard saint any day.

straight outta silver spring said...

"Where's Poot?" asked anon.

What if he's the C.I. that Kima mentioned to Bunk? That might be pretty cool. Think about it. Where the hell is he? Spider and Poot are the only ones alive from Bodie's old crew. Spider is still working. Poot, nowhere to be seen....

just a though.

trob said...

I feel you now, Anonymous. The Scott character is more interesting now. No doubt. Of course, that doesn't mean I sympathize with him, the way I sympathize with Omar. Omar has more integrity than Scott.

Also, I hope I didn't give the impression I thought you were amoral. The thought never crossed my mind.

Jarvis said...

I have a question about the phone call made by McNulty at the beginning of the episode. The cops had a pay phone tapped, correct? The one Scott claimed the killer had called him from.

But they seemed to know straight away this time the call was coming from a cell phone - but why would they believe anything other than that the call was coming from the payphone they had tapped? How did they "trap and trace" the call so quickly to Sydnor's location?

fuck you said...

Alan, please remove any speculation about spoilers, because, as someone said even without names its fairly obvious what they are talking about. I really wish I wouldn't have read what I just read. Fuck you to whoever posted it. you pretty much just ruined the ending to the best show ever created for me. FUCK. YOUUUUUUU.

Emma said...

I have to second the commenter who brought up the Congressional baseball/steroid hearings -- they were STRAIGHT out of the Wire.

One congressman, Mark Souder, even compared the players' silence on steroids to the anti-snitching culture around the drug trade, and specifically mentioned a family in Baltimore whose house had been fatally firebombed after they spoke to police.

I was yelling at my TV, "No! You do NOT get to drag poor Randy into this ridiculous circus for your own political gain!"

Sure, the Wire may have its fantastical elements, but man is it ever on target about so many things...

Anonymous said...

What a bunch of whiners! Why do you cry if a VERY VAGUE rumour is posted, Or a photo from an upcoming episode (that can have numerous meanings) is posted? "Baltimore Chick" didn't spoil anything. Throw a dart-there are many "evil characters" on this show. Either just watch the show & avoid the Internet, or watch the show, come here & realize no one is spoiling anything. "Lunatic Fringe".

Anonymous said...

I don't know, maybe because the first thing Alan wrote says "do not talk about future episodes."

Lunatic Fringe said...

Ido'n't know, maybe because the first thing Alan wrote says "do not talk about future episodes."

SHE GAVE NOTHING AWAY IN HER POST. TAKE A DEEP BREATH-CLICK YOUR HEELS TOGETHR-AND REPEAT (3X'S)-ITS A TV SHOW! Some of you would be better off just watching the Sunday episodes & skipping the ON Demand advance episodes & all message boards. I "get"how this show strikes an emotional chord, however, the vicious attacks are totally uncalled for. Show some class. "Lunatic Fringe"

Anonymous said...

"I have a question about the phone call made by McNulty at the beginning of the episode. The cops had a pay phone tapped, correct? The one Scott claimed the killer had called him from."

Jarvis -- it's complicated, and explained very briefly, but Jimmy definitely lies in the paperwork. To be honest, I can't remember if his lie is that the reporter got a call from a cell phone number, or that the police department got a call from the killer, but they definitely do explain away that disparity in passing. The wiretap is supposed to be on a cell phone they know the killer has used.

John I said...

Great episode. Here are a bunch of random thoughts.

The homeless serial killer story could simply die out. The news cycle is relentless and it may just become yesterday's news rather than blow up in anyone's face. If 22 bodies can so easily become a cold case, why not a few creepy homeless murders?

And I would not be at all surprised if Dukie does end up taking someone out. He is tired of being endlessly beat down, and has gone to Michael for a gun.

John I said...

In terms of if/how Marlo goes down, the other thing to emphasize is that Baltimore my be a major character in this show, it is but a small cog in the machine to the Greek. He is part of an institution that is a lot bigger and more powerful than the small time drug lords like Marlo. If Marlo makes things messy, the Greek could take him out in a heartbeat.

Other institutions that are bigger than Baltimore are the national gangs - Crips, Bloods, MS13 - that so far in the Wire have not played a role in the Game. In the past year or so, these have made inroads in the real Baltimore, where neighborhoods and corners that had been locally run are now becoming affiliated with national gangs. I would not be surprised if Simon uses this to some effect in wrapping things up.

It could make one feel as wistful about Marlo as some of us have become about the Barksdale 'good old days.' At least Marlo is a homegrown B-More boy.